For Better Yearbook Design, Work in an Art Class Feature

art-department-feature

Even though I’m not much of an artsy person myself, art was one of my favorite classes all the way through school. I loved being able to learn from a radically different perspective than what I was used to – and taking time to express myself outside of mandatory writing assignments was an incredible experience. The opportunity for creative expression is likely something that the students at your school love as well.

One area that often doesn’t get enough attention in yearbook design is the awesome art classes that everyone loves. But you have the power to change that. Art class learning moments can be an inspiration for an inspiring yearbook spread! Ready to get started? Here’s how to partner with your school’s art teachers to create a spectacular yearbook photo shoot.

Make a Yearbook Design Plan

The first step to creating an art feature is to sit down with the art teachers at your school and brainstorm some creative ideas. You don’t want only photos of students working on random projects in class. Instead, you want to see how they can take a cool concept from start to finish. Some ideas include:

  • Re-creating a fabulous piece by a famous artist
  • Developing an art show for all the parents
  • A collaborative project like a giant canvas colored by paint-filled water balloons

The best part about developing a unique art feature for your yearbook is that you’ll be working with some of the most creative people your school has to offer.

Develop a Narrative

For your art feature to shine, you should strive to tell a story from start to finish. When you lay out the feature pages, be sure to capture every step of the artistic process in images. Showing the full scope of the project from beginning to end creates a narrative that deepens engagement. As you “swatch” the art unfold before your eyes, make sure you also take notes – having project descriptions on-hand will make it easier to create the text content to accompany your photo spread.

Feature the Process, Not Just the End Product

To get the most of your art feature, remember that dedicated yearbook spreads are much more compelling when they explore the entire process, not just the finished product. Photos that show your students arriving at the art show, spattered in paint mid-project or even hanging the final versions of their works adds context and meaning to the spread.

This is also a chance to show how integral your art staff is to the campus learning experience. And if you want to kick this project up a notch, invite the art teachers to help design the layout of the feature. Getting them involved in the process is a perfect way to ensure their buy-in and create a cohesive feel between the project and your yearbook feature.

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